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When A Government Body Has The Last Laugh by Nicole Reaney Director of InsideOut PR

As we grow, the police force typically holds a fluctuating relationship in favourability. As a child, they were a source of safety and security. Getting lost in crowds, they were the one figure you counted on for safety. But as a teen through to the years as a younger adult, they were typically a force to be weary of. Whether it was driving, out for the night, or running amok with mates – the police were there to enforce the law and were not known for holding empathetic relationships.

Not sure if you have noticed the NSW Police Force Facebook page, but for such a potentially divisive organisation, they are nailing it capturing an audience of close to one million. Apart from being the expected source of minute to minute information on serious crime, community warnings and announcements, they’ve been able to reach and engage a multi-tiered public audience peppering entertaining content throughout their feed. Serious messages like speed or drinking warnings are articulately conveyed through a filter of humour – the underlying gravity of topic still evident and retained.

While many brands struggle to build a loyal following with millennials their social media has managed to capture the attention of the public – all ages – Z to Boomers.

Here are a few examples in case you have not seen it:

An average post will have over 10,000 comments and up to 500 shares as the public steps up to support the safety and protection of our community.

The humour threaded through more official authoritative content complements our Aussie culture. Compare this with the US, and the NYPD page with 750,000 followers houses content that you might expect from a government body. Posts are serious, sensitive, respectful and layered with US Pride.

While some organisations are renowned for their cheeky tone, humour is being seen in more and more unexpected brands and as a nation we respond positively to it. While lines may be crossed and people offended more easily with a more witty approach, when crafted skilfully it drives relatability, likeability and a more connected audience.

By Nicole Reaney, Director of InsideOut PR